2024 TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE CRUISE

>2024 TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE CRUISE
2024 TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE CRUISE2019-06-15T13:40:04+00:00

TOTAL ECLIPSE CRUISE FROM MEXICO: 

WHALES AND WOW!!

   OUR 55TH ECLIPSE EXPEDITION: MARCH 30-APRIL 8, 2024

Figure 1. An example total eclipse photo of what you might be able to take during our cruise. The Diamond Ring is on the left, prominence at the 2 o’clock position with the inner corona visible.  

Join Paul D. Maley of the NASA Johnson Space Center Astronomical Society on what will be his 84th solar eclipse adventure featuring 4.5 minutes of total eclipse!  Even though this eclipse passes over the USA and Mexico, we have decided the safest area and that most likely to have good weather is southwest of the Mexican coast.  For that reason we have begun to established a cruise program and the draft version is shown below.

Remember the crowds for the 2017 total eclipse in the USA? Avoid all of that on our cruise! See totality from the ocean. You can take great eclipse photos from a ship using high ISO numbers and short exposures.

YOU HAVE NO RISK.  DEPOSITS ARE BEING TAKEN NOW THAT ARE FULLY REFUNDABLE UNTIL THE CRUISE IS ANNOUNCED. ONCE THAT HAPPENS YOU WILL HAVE ONE WEEK TO DECIDE WHETHER TO CONTINUE OR TO CANCEL. AT THIS EARLY DATE, PRICES, EXACT DATES AND ITINERARY ARE NOT KNOWN AND WILL BE REFINED LATER.

WE INTEND TO FILL THE SHIP AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE AND INVITE YOU TO JOIN US SOON BEFORE IT IS SOLD OUT.

COST OF THE CRUISE: AN ESTIMATE OF $8,500 AND UP PER PERSON DEPENDING ON THE CABIN CLASS THAT YOU BOOK.

New to eclipse watching and not sure which company has experience? Ring of Fire Expeditions has the longest track record of eclipse expeditions in the US–almost 50 years (in 2019). To see the results of some past trips, go to our main page  www.eclipsetours.com and look at the horizontal bar showing various options. Click on PAST TRIPS.

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OPTIONAL PRE-CRUISE ACCOMMODATIONS

Spend 3 nights before we depart in an all-inclusive setting in Loreto, Mexico. Guests will be transferred to the ship on DAY 1 of the cruise program. Details to be announced later.

The following is a draft itinerary and will be changed prior to 2024 but it will give you a rough idea of our plan.

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Figure 2. Satellite imagery taken in 2019 at the time of totality on eclipse day illustrating why we prefer our cruise location southeast of Los Cabos. Courtesy University of Wisconsin, Space Science & Engineering Center. Though Texas appears clear, it was mostly cloudy/overcast in the 5 preceding days. Note, there is never a way to guarantee seeing an eclipse due to the unpredictability of local weather wherever you are.

BASIC CRUISE PROGRAM “LORETO TO LOS CABOS, MEXICO” featuring blue whales (and maybe others), dolphins and the Total Eclipse of the Sun. (TO BE REVISED)

B=breakfast, L=lunch, D=dinner

DAY 1: Home / Loreto / Embark

Fly into Loreto (AIR NOT INCLUDED) and transfer to your ship (name will be announced in 2020 or 2021) to set sail on the Sea of Cortez. (D)

DAY 2-7: Exploring the Sea of Cortez

Figure 3. Graphic of typical route in the Gulf of California to be modified later for our eclipse sailing.

Our routing is designed with flexibility in mind, to maximize opportunities for wildlife sightings. It will most likely include the islands and activities listed below, although the order may vary. (B,L,D daily)

Islas San Esteban and San Pedro Mártir:Walk up a desert wash, to search for desert birds and the endemic pinto chuckwalla—a plump, harmless desert lizard. Later visit Isla San Pedro Mártir, a 1,000-foot-high guano-covered island that is home to thousands of seabirds: brown pelicans, magnificent frigate birds, Brandt’s cormorants and California sea lions.

Isla San Marcos: At Isla San Marcos there is a beautiful shoreline for swimming, snorkeling, and kayaking. In the afternoon we are again in rich whale waters, near the mouth of Bahía Concepción where we have excellent possibilities of sighting several species of whales, including fin or sperm.

Figure 4. Whale in profile. P. Maley photo.

Isla San José: One of the larger islands in the Sea of Cortez, San José offers several landing possibilities depending on conditions and the whim of the moment. Photograph the ochre cliffs of the island’s eastern shore, hike an “enchanted” arroyo, or visit the abandoned salt works to the west. Explore the Sea of Cortez in springtime: among the best times and places in the world to see a great variety of whales, plus dolphins in abundance. With a flexible itinerary, rely on our expert staff to follow the seasonal movements of migrating birds and feeding whales ensuring excellent wildlife sightings. Hike forests of giant cacti, snorkel with sea lions, and discover rare wildlife among desert islands.

Figure 5. A great opportunity for eclipse chasers to spend a honeymoon. Tina Greene and John Bevington. This is also an example of our ECLIPSE CASUAL dress code!  P. Maley photo.

Bahía Loreto Marine Park: This morning we’ll search for whales in the waters south of Isla Carmen, an area that has proven to be one of the best for finding blue whales, and often bottlenose and common dolphins. In the afternoon we visit one of the islands of Bahía Loreto Marine Park, with ample time for kayaking, snorkeling, stand-up paddleboarding and possibly hiking. In the evening, enjoy a beach barbecue under the desert sky.

Figure 6. The mysterious Green Flash sighted on the horizon. B. Hulse photo.

Los Islotes and Isla San Francisco: At Los Islotes, don flippers, a mask and snorkel (which we’ll gladly provide) and swim with curious sea lions. We have a leisurely afternoon to swim, kayak or hike at Isla San Francisco. Endemic yellow-footed gulls, brown pelicans and blue-footed boobies are all part of the landscape. Finish the day with a relaxing beach barbecue complete with a bonfire and a star-filled sky. (B,L,D)

DAY 8: HEAD FOR THE ECLIPSE PATH

Proceed southeast toward the path of total eclipse.  Observe the night sky as weather permits.  (B,L,D)

DAY 9: ECLIPSE OBSERVATION

Figure 7. Imagery of the eclipse path southwest of the main coastline of Mexico and our proposed intercept location. Map courtesy X. Jubier.

Today we will view the entire solar eclipse process*.  Enjoy what should be a spectacular sky show with the total eclipse lasting 4 minutes 25 seconds.

Venus seen with the naked eye about 30 minutes before totality. LeRoy Maxfield photo.

Start of partial eclipse: 10:45am

Figure 8. The beginning of the partial eclipse as seen on our 2016 cruise on the Silver Discoverer. Notice the sunspots and granulation. LeRoy Maxfield photo.

Start of total eclipse: 12:01pm

Figure 9. The end of the total eclipse with the appearance of a bright glow at the receding limb. Note the prominence at the 11 o’clock position and the thin pinkish chromosphere layer on the right side. LeRoy Maxfield photo.

End total eclipse: 12:05pm

Figure 10. Even the Captain stepped outside to view totality on our last cruise! Taken with a point and shoot camera with the flash disabled. P. Maley photo.

 Figure 11. A fish-eye lens captures the entire sky during totality. The dark area is the Moon’s shadow above the ocean, the light area shows the area outside the shadow where only a partial eclipse is seen until daylight is recovered.  P. Reiff photo.

End partial eclipse: 1:26pm

After the eclipse begin the sail back to Los Cabos. It is possible that we will arrive later that day instead of on Day 10.

Figure 12. Watching the eclipse on our 2013 total eclipse cruise. Typically most photographers bring a tripod-mounted camera with telephoto lens.  A chair to sit in comes in handy while staking out your spot on deck.  B. Braswell photo.

DAY 10: RETURN TO LOS CABOS